Electronic music machines : the new musical instruments / Jean-Michel Réveillac.

Av: Réveillac, Jean-Michel [aut]
Language: English Serie: Waves series: Publisher: London : Wiley-ISTE, [2019]Copyright date: ©2019Beskrivning: xxi, 354 pages illustrations 25 cmInnehållstyp: text | still image Mediatyp: unmediated Bärartyp: volumeISBN: 1786303256; 9781786303257Ämne(n): Elektriska musikinstrument | Synt | Electronic musical instruments | Synthesizer (Musical instrument)Ytterligare fysiska format: Electronic version:: Electronic music machinesDDK-klassifikation: 786.7 LOC-klassifikation: ML1092 | .R48 2019
Anmärkning:
Preface ; Introduction ; Chapter 1. Electronic Music ; 1.1. Musique concrète ; 1.2. The beginnings of electronic music ; 1.3. Electroacoustic music ; 1.4. Acousmatic music ; 1.5. And much, much more ; 1.6. Maturity ; 1.7. Different paths to music ; 1.8. Today and tomorrow ; 1.9. Electronic music and counter-culturalism ; 1.10. Final remarks ; Chapter 2. When Revolution Holds Us in Its Grasp ; 2.1. From analog to digital ; 2.2. Popular music and electronic music ; 2.2.1. New wave ; 2.2.2. House music ; 2.2.3. Techno ; 2.2.4. New beat ; 2.2.5. Acid house ; 2.2.6. Acid jazz ; 2.2.7. Ambient ; 2.2.8. Hip-hop and rap ; 2.2.9. Trance ; 2.2.10. Electro or contemporary electro ; 2.3. Final remarks ; Chapter 3. The MIDI Standard ; 3.1. History ; 3.2. How MIDI works ; 3.2.1. The hardware level ; 3.2.2. The software level ; 3.3. Examples of MIDI transmission ; 3.3.1. Note-on/note-off messages ; 3.3.2. Program change message ; 3.4. The MIDI implementation chart ; 3.5. The General MIDI standard ; 3.5.1. Specifications ; 3.6. The General MIDI 2 standard ; 3.7. The GS format ; 3.8. The XG format ; 3.9. The structure of a MIDI file ; 3.9.1. Header chunks ; 3.9.2. Track chunks ; 3.9.3. Example of a MIDI file ; 3.10. MIDI devices ; 3.10.1. MIDI boxes, mergers, and patchers ; 3.10.2. Musical instruments ; 3.10.3. Studio hardware ; 3.10.4. MIDI to computer ; 3.11. Conclusion ; Chapter 4. Sequencers ; 4.1. Mechanical and electrical machines ; 4.1.1. Music boxes ; 4.1.2. Mechanical pianos ; 4.1.3. Barrel organs ; 4.1.4. Fairground organs ; 4.2. Analog sequencers ; 4.3. Digital sequencers ; 4.4. Software sequencers ; 4.5. Final remarks ; Chapter 5. Drum Machines ; 5.1. On the subject of electromechanical rhythm ; 5.2. Drum machines with presets ; 5.3. Programmable drum machines ; 5.4. The MIDI age ; 5.5. Drum machines with sampled sounds ; 5.6. Rhythms, software, and computers ; 5.7. Final remarks ; Chapter 6. Samplers ; 6.1. History of samplers ; 6.1.1. Basic principles ; 6.1.2. The arrival of the Mellotron ; 6.1.3. Samplers ; 6.1.4. Software samplers ; 6.2. History of musical styles ; 6.3. Architecture and principles ; 6.4. Final remarks ; Chapter 7. Groove Machines ; 7.1. Structure ; 7.2. Famous groove machines ; 7.2.1. E-mu SP12 (1985) ; 7.2.2. AKAI MPC-60 (1988) ; 7.2.3. Roland MC-303 (1996) ; 7.2.4. AKAI MPC 2000XL (1999) ; 7.2.5. Roland MC-909 (2003) ; 7.2.6. Elektron Octatrack DPS 1 (2011) ; 7.2.7. Korg Electribe 2 (2014) and Korg Electribe Sampler (2015) ; 7.2.8. Novation Circuit (2015) ; 7.2.9. Teenage Electronics Pocket Operator PO-32 (2017) ; 7.3. Software groove machines ; 7.3.1. Image Line Groove Machine ; 7.3.2. Propellerhead Reason ; 7.3.3. Ableton Live ; 7.4. Controllers and software ; 7.4.1. Native Instruments Maschine (2009) ; 7.4.2. Roland MPC Studio Black (2017) ; 7.5. iGroove machines ; 7.6. Final remarks ; Chapter 8. Vocoders ; 8.1. History ; 8.2. Working principle of the vocoder ; 8.3. Machines and equipment ; 8.3.1. EMS Vocoder 2000 ; 8.3.2. EMS Vocoder 5000 ; 8.3.3. EMS Vocoder 3000 ; 8.3.4. Roland VP-330 ; 8.3.5. Korg VC-10 ; 8.3.6. Moog Vocoder ; 8.3.7. Roland SVC-350 ; 8.3.8. Electrix Warp Factory ; 8.3.9. Korg MS2000 ; 8.3.10. Microkorg ; 8.3.11. Roland VP-550 ; 8.3.12. The Music and More VF11 ; 8.3.13. Novation Mininova ; 8.3.14. Digitech Talker ; 8.3.15. Electro-Harmonix V256 ; 8.3.16. A few more unusual examples ; 8.4. Software vocoders ; 8.5. One step further ; 8.5.1. Talkbox ; 8.5.2. Auto-Tune ; 8.6. Final remarks ; Chapter 9. Octatrack: Maintenance, Repairs, and Tips ; 9.1. Updating the software ; 9.1.1. Updating the operating system ; 9.2. Testing the OT ; 9.2.1. Testing the push buttons ; 9.2.2. Testing the dials ; 9.2.3. Testing the x-fader ; 9.2.4. Analysis and results ; 9.3. Hardware repairs ; 9.3.1. Opening up the OT ; 9.3.2. Replacing the push buttons ; 9.3.3. Replacing the battery ; 9.3.4. Replacing the x-fader ; 9.3.5. Replacing an incremental encoder ; 9.4. Final remarks ; Chapter 10. Octatrack: MIDI Sequences and Arpeggios ; 10.1. Setup and configuration ; 10.1.1. Connections and software settings ; 10.1.2. Creating a new project ; 10.1.3. Creating a THRU device (machine) ; 10.1.4. Setting up the MIDI connection between the OT and the instrument ; 10.2. Creating a MIDI sequence using triggers ; 10.2.1. MIDI track ; 10.2.2. Creating a musical sequence ; 10.2.3. A multi-page sequence ; 10.3. Creating a sequence with the arpeggiator ; 10.3.1. Presentation of the arpeggiator ; 10.3.2. A simple arpeggio ; 10.3.3. Defining an arpeggio graphically ; 10.3.4. More complex arpeggios ; 10.3.5. Triggers in chromatic mode ; 10.3.6. Saving a MIDI sequence from an external instrument ; 10.4. Creating a MIDI sequence with a drum machine ; 10.5. MIDI sequences, rhythms, and CC codes ; Chapter 11. Korg Electribe: Maintenance and Hardware Tips ; 11.1. Overview ; 11.1.1. Electribe 2 ; 11.1.2. Electribe Sampler ; 11.2. MIDI cables ; 11.2.1. Male 3.5 mm jack to female 5-pin DIN adapter ; 11.2.2. Male 3.5 mm jack to male 5-pin DIN cable ; 11.3. Updating the operating system ; 11.4. Electribe 2 to Electribe Sampler ; 11.4.1. Migrating to the Electribe Sampler ; 11.4.2. Reverting to the Electribe 2 ; 11.4.3. Downgrading the Electribe ; 11.4.4. Editing the operating system files ; 11.4.5. Major operating system versions of the Electribe 2 ; 11.5. Conclusion ; Chapter 12. Korg Electribe: Software Tips ; 12.1. Menu tree of the Electribe 2 and the Electribe Sampler ; 12.2. Shortcuts ; 12.3. Using the audio input ; 12.3.1. Through the Electribe ; 12.3.2. Saving a carrier pattern ; 12.3.3. Filtering and applying effects ; 12.3.4. Sending commands to the synthesizer using triggers ; 12.3.5. Sequencer, synthesizer, filters, and effects ; 12.4. Extra tips ; 12.4.1. Octave switching ; 12.4.2. Viewing the current settings of a PART ; 12.4.3. Controlling two different synthesizers from the MIDI out ; 12.5. Final remarks ; Conclusion ; Appendices ; Appendix 1. CV/Gate ; Appendix 2. Digital Inputs/Outputs ; Appendix 3. The General MIDI (GM) Standard ; Appendix 4. Plugins ; Appendix 5. Control and MIDI Dump Software ; Bibliography ; Index
Anmärkning bestånd: EMS : H1 Libris-ID: 3fksgb3q1z5fv78sSummary: "Since 1960, with the advent of musical electronics, composers and musicians have been using ever more sophisticated machines to create sonic material that presents innovation, color and new styles: electro-acoustic, electro, house, techno, etc. music. The music of Pierre Henry, Kraftwerk, Pink Floyd, Daft Punk and many others has introduced new sounds, improbable rhythms and a unique approach to composition and notation. Electronic machines have become essential: they have built and influenced the music of the most recent decades and set the trend for future productions. This book explores the theory and practice related to the different machines which constitute the universe of musical electronics, omitting synthesizers which are treated in other works. Sequencers, drum machines, samplers, groove machines and vocoders from 1960 to today are studied in their historical, physical and theoretical context. More detailed approaches to the Elektron Octatrack sequencer-sampler and the Korg Electribe 2 groove machine are also included."
List(s) this item appears in: EMS litteratur och musik 2020
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Musik- och teaterbiblioteket
Elektronmusikstudion EMS
EMS : H1 Available (Längre framtagningstid) 26201850139
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages 341-348) and index

Preface ; Introduction ; Chapter 1. Electronic Music ; 1.1. Musique concrète ; 1.2. The beginnings of electronic music ; 1.3. Electroacoustic music ; 1.4. Acousmatic music ; 1.5. And much, much more ; 1.6. Maturity ; 1.7. Different paths to music ; 1.8. Today and tomorrow ; 1.9. Electronic music and counter-culturalism ; 1.10. Final remarks ; Chapter 2. When Revolution Holds Us in Its Grasp ; 2.1. From analog to digital ; 2.2. Popular music and electronic music ; 2.2.1. New wave ; 2.2.2. House music ; 2.2.3. Techno ; 2.2.4. New beat ; 2.2.5. Acid house ; 2.2.6. Acid jazz ; 2.2.7. Ambient ; 2.2.8. Hip-hop and rap ; 2.2.9. Trance ; 2.2.10. Electro or contemporary electro ; 2.3. Final remarks ; Chapter 3. The MIDI Standard ; 3.1. History ; 3.2. How MIDI works ; 3.2.1. The hardware level ; 3.2.2. The software level ; 3.3. Examples of MIDI transmission ; 3.3.1. Note-on/note-off messages ; 3.3.2. Program change message ; 3.4. The MIDI implementation chart ; 3.5. The General MIDI standard ; 3.5.1. Specifications ; 3.6. The General MIDI 2 standard ; 3.7. The GS format ; 3.8. The XG format ; 3.9. The structure of a MIDI file ; 3.9.1. Header chunks ; 3.9.2. Track chunks ; 3.9.3. Example of a MIDI file ; 3.10. MIDI devices ; 3.10.1. MIDI boxes, mergers, and patchers ; 3.10.2. Musical instruments ; 3.10.3. Studio hardware ; 3.10.4. MIDI to computer ; 3.11. Conclusion ; Chapter 4. Sequencers ; 4.1. Mechanical and electrical machines ; 4.1.1. Music boxes ; 4.1.2. Mechanical pianos ; 4.1.3. Barrel organs ; 4.1.4. Fairground organs ; 4.2. Analog sequencers ; 4.3. Digital sequencers ; 4.4. Software sequencers ; 4.5. Final remarks ; Chapter 5. Drum Machines ; 5.1. On the subject of electromechanical rhythm ; 5.2. Drum machines with presets ; 5.3. Programmable drum machines ; 5.4. The MIDI age ; 5.5. Drum machines with sampled sounds ; 5.6. Rhythms, software, and computers ; 5.7. Final remarks ; Chapter 6. Samplers ; 6.1. History of samplers ; 6.1.1. Basic principles ; 6.1.2. The arrival of the Mellotron ; 6.1.3. Samplers ; 6.1.4. Software samplers ; 6.2. History of musical styles ; 6.3. Architecture and principles ; 6.4. Final remarks ; Chapter 7. Groove Machines ; 7.1. Structure ; 7.2. Famous groove machines ; 7.2.1. E-mu SP12 (1985) ; 7.2.2. AKAI MPC-60 (1988) ; 7.2.3. Roland MC-303 (1996) ; 7.2.4. AKAI MPC 2000XL (1999) ; 7.2.5. Roland MC-909 (2003) ; 7.2.6. Elektron Octatrack DPS 1 (2011) ; 7.2.7. Korg Electribe 2 (2014) and Korg Electribe Sampler (2015) ; 7.2.8. Novation Circuit (2015) ; 7.2.9. Teenage Electronics Pocket Operator PO-32 (2017) ; 7.3. Software groove machines ; 7.3.1. Image Line Groove Machine ; 7.3.2. Propellerhead Reason ; 7.3.3. Ableton Live ; 7.4. Controllers and software ; 7.4.1. Native Instruments Maschine (2009) ; 7.4.2. Roland MPC Studio Black (2017) ; 7.5. iGroove machines ; 7.6. Final remarks ; Chapter 8. Vocoders ; 8.1. History ; 8.2. Working principle of the vocoder ; 8.3. Machines and equipment ; 8.3.1. EMS Vocoder 2000 ; 8.3.2. EMS Vocoder 5000 ; 8.3.3. EMS Vocoder 3000 ; 8.3.4. Roland VP-330 ; 8.3.5. Korg VC-10 ; 8.3.6. Moog Vocoder ; 8.3.7. Roland SVC-350 ; 8.3.8. Electrix Warp Factory ; 8.3.9. Korg MS2000 ; 8.3.10. Microkorg ; 8.3.11. Roland VP-550 ; 8.3.12. The Music and More VF11 ; 8.3.13. Novation Mininova ; 8.3.14. Digitech Talker ; 8.3.15. Electro-Harmonix V256 ; 8.3.16. A few more unusual examples ; 8.4. Software vocoders ; 8.5. One step further ; 8.5.1. Talkbox ; 8.5.2. Auto-Tune ; 8.6. Final remarks ; Chapter 9. Octatrack: Maintenance, Repairs, and Tips ; 9.1. Updating the software ; 9.1.1. Updating the operating system ; 9.2. Testing the OT ; 9.2.1. Testing the push buttons ; 9.2.2. Testing the dials ; 9.2.3. Testing the x-fader ; 9.2.4. Analysis and results ; 9.3. Hardware repairs ; 9.3.1. Opening up the OT ; 9.3.2. Replacing the push buttons ; 9.3.3. Replacing the battery ; 9.3.4. Replacing the x-fader ; 9.3.5. Replacing an incremental encoder ; 9.4. Final remarks ; Chapter 10. Octatrack: MIDI Sequences and Arpeggios ; 10.1. Setup and configuration ; 10.1.1. Connections and software settings ; 10.1.2. Creating a new project ; 10.1.3. Creating a THRU device (machine) ; 10.1.4. Setting up the MIDI connection between the OT and the instrument ; 10.2. Creating a MIDI sequence using triggers ; 10.2.1. MIDI track ; 10.2.2. Creating a musical sequence ; 10.2.3. A multi-page sequence ; 10.3. Creating a sequence with the arpeggiator ; 10.3.1. Presentation of the arpeggiator ; 10.3.2. A simple arpeggio ; 10.3.3. Defining an arpeggio graphically ; 10.3.4. More complex arpeggios ; 10.3.5. Triggers in chromatic mode ; 10.3.6. Saving a MIDI sequence from an external instrument ; 10.4. Creating a MIDI sequence with a drum machine ; 10.5. MIDI sequences, rhythms, and CC codes ; Chapter 11. Korg Electribe: Maintenance and Hardware Tips ; 11.1. Overview ; 11.1.1. Electribe 2 ; 11.1.2. Electribe Sampler ; 11.2. MIDI cables ; 11.2.1. Male 3.5 mm jack to female 5-pin DIN adapter ; 11.2.2. Male 3.5 mm jack to male 5-pin DIN cable ; 11.3. Updating the operating system ; 11.4. Electribe 2 to Electribe Sampler ; 11.4.1. Migrating to the Electribe Sampler ; 11.4.2. Reverting to the Electribe 2 ; 11.4.3. Downgrading the Electribe ; 11.4.4. Editing the operating system files ; 11.4.5. Major operating system versions of the Electribe 2 ; 11.5. Conclusion ; Chapter 12. Korg Electribe: Software Tips ; 12.1. Menu tree of the Electribe 2 and the Electribe Sampler ; 12.2. Shortcuts ; 12.3. Using the audio input ; 12.3.1. Through the Electribe ; 12.3.2. Saving a carrier pattern ; 12.3.3. Filtering and applying effects ; 12.3.4. Sending commands to the synthesizer using triggers ; 12.3.5. Sequencer, synthesizer, filters, and effects ; 12.4. Extra tips ; 12.4.1. Octave switching ; 12.4.2. Viewing the current settings of a PART ; 12.4.3. Controlling two different synthesizers from the MIDI out ; 12.5. Final remarks ; Conclusion ; Appendices ; Appendix 1. CV/Gate ; Appendix 2. Digital Inputs/Outputs ; Appendix 3. The General MIDI (GM) Standard ; Appendix 4. Plugins ; Appendix 5. Control and MIDI Dump Software ; Bibliography ; Index

"Since 1960, with the advent of musical electronics, composers and musicians have been using ever more sophisticated machines to create sonic material that presents innovation, color and new styles: electro-acoustic, electro, house, techno, etc. music. The music of Pierre Henry, Kraftwerk, Pink Floyd, Daft Punk and many others has introduced new sounds, improbable rhythms and a unique approach to composition and notation. Electronic machines have become essential: they have built and influenced the music of the most recent decades and set the trend for future productions. This book explores the theory and practice related to the different machines which constitute the universe of musical electronics, omitting synthesizers which are treated in other works. Sequencers, drum machines, samplers, groove machines and vocoders from 1960 to today are studied in their historical, physical and theoretical context. More detailed approaches to the Elektron Octatrack sequencer-sampler and the Korg Electribe 2 groove machine are also included."

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